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What to Expect at Your Puppy’s First Vet Visit

Bringing your new puppy home is an exciting time for the whole family! During the excitement, don’t forget to bring your newest family member to the vet for important services that help him put his best paw forward. Find out what you can expect when you bring your puppy to the vet.

When Should Your Puppy’s First Vet Visit Be?

We recommend that you bring your puppy in for a veterinarian appointment within a week of adoption to ensure he’s in good health. Shelters and breeders usually have contracts that require you to get your puppy checked by a vet within a certain timeframe, so be sure to read the details of this paperwork before scheduling an appointment.

If your dog is showing signs of problems, bring him to a vet as soon as possible. Clinics like Cinco Ranch Veterinary Hospital allow for walk-ins if you’re not able to make an appointment on short notice.

Getting Ready for Your Puppy’s First Vet Visit

Your puppy’s first vet visit might sound stressful, but it doesn’t have to be! You can ask your veterinarian what you should bring to your appointment, but it’s always a good idea to have these items in preparation for a comfortable visit for both you and your pup.

A Collar and Leash

Your puppy should be getting comfortable on a leash and collar (or a harness) as soon as possible. There may be other dogs at the clinic when you visit, and you want to ensure you can keep your puppy nearby and away from trouble, especially in this new environment.

If your dog is smaller or not quite comfortable on a leash yet, you can also consider using a small dog carrier for the time being.

Medical Records and Paperwork

Whether you adopted your puppy from the shelter, a pet store, or a breeder, your dog has medical records and other relevant paperwork. This could be details about:

  • His breed
  • Past vaccinations
  • Prior medical problems

These documents are important at your puppy’s first vet visit, so your veterinarian knows exactly what vaccines and/or treatments to schedule for your dog in the future.

Dog Treats

Dog treats and praise are wonderful ways to get your puppy acclimated to a new environment! Visiting the veterinarian for the first time can be stressful for many pups, with loud dogs, cats, or even birds—plus all the new people! There’s a lot going on during a visit to the vet.

Your dog may also be afraid of the veterinarian or veterinary care. Dog treats will help him associate his doctor with good food. Many vets also have treats on hand, so if you forget them, we have you covered!

Questions or Concerns You Have About Your New Puppy

Puppies can be a handful, and it’s okay to have questions about their care or training, especially if you’re new to dog ownership. If you have questions or concerns about your pup’s health, dog training, breed, dog food options, or anything else, write them down and bring them to ask at your veterinary visit.

A Fecal Sample

It’s always a great idea to bring a stool sample with you to the veterinarian. This will allow the clinic to test your new family member for worms or other issues. If you’re on the fence about bringing one, call to ask before your appointment.

Payment

The cost of a puppy’s first vet visit depends on what your puppy has done during the exam. Usually the visit itself costs between $45 and $55, though this varies from doctor to doctor. Also take into account:

A fecal exam, for example, costs between $25 and $45, and a heartworm test can cost around $50.

For future visits, you may want to consider the benefits of pet insurance. It can help you cover regular visits as well as unexpected emergencies. Talk to us to learn more!

puppy first vet visit

Your Puppy’s First Vet Visit – What to Expect

You have your puppy, his paperwork, your questions about his care, and a fecal sample. Now it’s time to meet the vet! The veterinarian and vet techs will complete a few different tasks during your puppy’s visit.

Take His Vital Signs

One of the first things the vet tech or vet will do is take your puppy’s vital signs. These include:

  • Checking his heart rate with a stethoscope
  • Getting his weight – If your puppy is under- or overweight, they will provide nutritional and exercise advice to help get your dog on track to a healthier weight.
  • Taking his temperature – A normal temperature for puppies is between 99.5° and 102.5° F degrees. Something outside those numbers could indicate an issue.

Complete a Nose-to-Tail Examination

Once the vitals are jotted down, your vet will complete an entire nose-to-tail exam of your puppy, checking his mouth and teeth to his paws to getting a good feel for his coat and skin. The vet will be looking for any obvious or not-so-obvious issues, such as:

  • Fleas and ticks
  • Issues with the lymph nodes
  • Worms

Give Vaccinations That Are Due

Depending on your puppy’s age, he may be due for vaccinations. At four months, for example, he’ll need a rabies shot. Your veterinarian will create a vaccination schedule over the next year or so to ensure he’s properly protected.

Over the next few months, you should expect your puppy to need shots for:

  • Rabies
  • Kennel cough
  • Distemper
  • Parvovirus
  • Hepatitis
  • Leptospirosis
  • Coronavirus
  • Lyme disease

To learn more about the core vaccinations and boosters your puppy will need, take a look at this vaccination rundown we created for dog owners.

Scheduling Future Visits for Your Puppy

After the examination, your vet will discuss your puppy’s future visits. This could be to check on any issues found during the exam or to schedule future vaccinations and boosters. You’ll also want to talk about scheduling an appointment for a spay or neuter during this time.

In the future, your dog should have annual appointments with your veterinarian to complete any vaccinations, test for heartworm, and just ensure your family member is still in excellent health.

Scheduling your puppy’s first vet visit as soon as possible is in his best interest! It can find any health issues with your newest family member while also getting him on the right track of a healthy life ahead.

Are you adopting a puppy or a new dog? Schedule his appointment now! Our experienced veterinarians and vet techs can help ensure your visit is stress-free and comfortable for both you and your pup. To make an appointment, call us at 281-693-7387.

What to Expect at Your Kitten’s First Vet Visit

Did you recently adopt a kitten? Congratulations! One of the most important things about new pet ownership is scheduling their first vet visit. If your kitten is new to your household, here’s what you should expect when you bring him to the vet for the first time.

When Should You Bring Your Kitten In for a Check-Up?

Your kitten’s first vet visit should happen as soon as possible. It’s recommended that you schedule an appointment two to three days after adopting. Many shelters and breeders require you to visit a veterinarian after adopting and give you a window of seven days or fewer.

If your cat is showing signs of illness, however, an even earlier appointment may be needed. Keep an eye out for:

  • Watery eyes
  • Worms
  • Fleas
  • Sneezing
  • Refusing to eat
  • Difficulty breathing

Getting Your Kitten Ready for His First Vet Visit 

There are a few things you’ll need as you get ready for your kitten’s trip to the vet!

A Cat Carrier

We never recommend carrying your cat into our office in your arms, as the waiting room often has other animals, such as dogs, that can scare or threaten your pet. Kittens can be very slippery!

Instead, choose a hard case carrier or a soft carrier. A bigger one that your cat can grow into is fine.

Paperwork 

Whether you adopted your kitten from a shelter or a breeder, your cat most likely came with some paperwork. This usually includes:

  • Any vaccinations he received
  • Whether your cat was spayed or neutered
  • Notes about his age
  • Information about prior health issues

A Stool Sample

Some vets request that you bring a stool sample with your kitten. This may not always be required, so ask your veterinarian before you scoop some up and bring it in a sealed baggie.

Cat Treats

Some kittens take to the vet a bit easier than others. Even if your little one is brave, cat treats can do wonders. They can help your new pet associate the vet with good things and make him less likely to become uncomfortable on later visits.

Payment 

How much your kitten’s first vet visit will cost depends on what has already been completed by the shelter, store, or breeder. A checkup regularly runs about $20 to $40, but if your cat’s being tested for anything, he needs medication, or he’s getting vaccinations, the cost can be more.

If you’re curious how much a checkup for your kitten will cost, contact us for a more accurate quote.

kittens first vet visit

Your Kitten’s First Exam: What to Expect 

Once you’ve scheduled your kitten’s first vet appointment and have the supplies you need to get him to the office, it’s time to actually meet the vet! Your vet will perform a physical exam and tests. Here are some of the things you can expect your vet to do at your kitten’s appointment:

Take His Vitals

The first portion of the physical exam includes weighing your kitten and taking his temperature. Your vet will let you know if your cat is under or overweight and give you nutritional advice.

The normal temperature range for kittens is 101° F to 103° F. Anything outside of that range could point to a problem.

Check His Entire Body 

The vet will then look over the kitten’s entire body. This includes an inspection of the:

  • Coat
  • Eyes
  • Ears
  • Mouth
  • Joints
  • Organs

They will feel the stomach for any abnormalities and listen to the lungs and heart.

Look for Parasites

Parasites can be a problem for kittens and cats that come from a shelter, so your vet will definitely inspect your new pet for them. Mites like to make a home within the ears, for instance, while fleas stick to the fur. Fleas often leave behind flea eggs and flea dirt (flea poop), so your vet will inspect your kitten for these signs in addition to keeping an eye out for adult fleas.

Perform a Fecal Analysis 

If your vet requested that you bring in a stool sample, they’ll do a fecal analysis. This allows them to check for worms as well as other intestinal problems. If something abnormal is found, they can start treating your kitten right away.

Draw Blood  

If your cat is older than nine weeks, it’s important that your veterinarian perform blood tests to check for FeLV and FIV. FeLV is feline leukemia virus, and it’s a serious problem that negatively affects a cat’s immune system. Signs are not always obvious, so testing your new cat is a must.

FIV and FeLV are often confused for one another, but FIV is feline immunodeficiency virus. Care is important to keep your cat comfortable, so blood tests can help you know what to expect regarding your cat’s health. With proper steps, a kitten with FIV can live a normal life.

Your Kitten May Need Vaccinations 

If your kitten is old enough, he may be able to get his first shots during his first vet visit! The first rabies shot, for example, can be given between 8 and 12 weeks old. If your cat is not quite ready for his vaccinations, it’s important to schedule appointments for later dates for:

  • Rabies
  • Feline rhinotracheitis
  • Feline calicivirus
  • Feline panleukopenia
  • Feline leukemia
  • Bordetella
  • FIV
  • Chlamydophilia felis

Not all kittens need all the above shots, so talk to your veterinarian to work out a vaccination schedule based on their recommendations. Vaccinations can help keep serious diseases at bay.

Schedule a Follow-Up Visit

It’s always a good idea to schedule a follow-up visit for your kitten after he’s completed his first visit to the vet, especially if your little one needs vaccinations or to be spayed or neutered. After the initial visits, your new family member should see the veterinarian at least once a year to ensure his health is in good shape.

A kitten’s first trip to the vet doesn’t have to be scary! Having the right materials on hand can make the trip comfortable for both you and your new pet. If you have adopted a new kitten, never skip the first vet appointment. It’s a vital step in ensuring your little family member lives a long and healthy life.

Cinco Ranch Veterinary Hospital looks forward to meeting the two of you! To schedule an appointment, call 281-693-7387.

Heartworm in Cats: Signs, Prevention, Treatment

While heartworm is more common in dogs than cats, cat owners should still be vigilant about this parasite. It’s often mistaken for other ailments, so knowing what to be aware of can get your cat much needed treatment before she gets sick. Here’s what you need to know about heartworm in cats, the signs and symptoms, and what you should do if you believe your cat has heartworms.

What Are Heartworms?

Heartworms, also known as dirofilaria immitis, are parasites. When an animal is affected, heartworms tend to make their home in the heart and lungs. They can grow to be a foot long. A heartworm’s favorite host is the dog and similar animals like the fox, coyote, and wolf. But they don’t just stick to canines. It is possible for cats to be infected by this parasite as well.

Thankfully, most heartworms don’t make it to adulthood in cats. Felines are more resistant to the parasite, so heartworms have a hard time surviving. If parasites manage to live into adulthood, there will probably only be one to three at a time in the cat’s heart or lungs, compared to a dog, which can host hundreds.

Unfortunately, fewer worms make the issue more difficult to diagnose. More likely causes of health issues in cats get investigated first. That’s a problem because even immature worms can cause severe health issues for infected cats, including heartworm associated respiratory disease (HARD).

What Causes Heartworm Disease in Cats?

Heartworms are transferred from animal to animal through mosquitoes. After feeding on an infected animal, a mosquito carries the larvae in its body, where it develops over a two-week period. When it’s ready, the larvae enters an animal through the bite of the infected mosquito, where it is left to start its six-month cycle to adult heartworm. It’s important to note that heartworms are not contagious and can’t be passed from cat to cat or from dog to cat.

The parasite can be found throughout the United States and is much more common in an area that is home to a lot of mosquitoes. It used to be the case that heartworm wasn’t found in all 50 states, but due to urbanization and irrigation, this is no longer true. If you have seen mosquitoes, your pets can be susceptible to catching the parasite.

3 Mosquito-Borne Illnesses

What Are the Symptoms of a Heartworm Infection?

In cats, symptoms of heartworm aren’t always obvious. There could be no signs, or there could be several. It depends on the cat as well as the stages and locations of the worms.

Here are some signs of heartworm to be on the lookout for:

  • Coughing
  • Vomiting
  • Lack of appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Fainting
  • Difficulty walking
  • Seizures
  • Fluid in abdomen
  • Diarrhea
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Gagging
  • Lethargy

Sadly, in some cases, there will be no signs until a cat collapses or dies from the parasite.

How Can Heartworms in Cats Be Treated?

Your vet can test for heartworm in your cat by taking a blood sample and use a combination of heartworm antibody and antigen tests. If heartworm proteins are found, they will request more tests, such as complete blood counts, X-rays, and ultrasounds.

There is no straightforward treatment for heartworm in cats and no standard cure. The medications used to cure heartworm disease in dogs can be fatal to cats, so should never be used. Instead, veterinarians often take a monitoring approach, with support.

The first step after a heartworm diagnosis is to stabilize your cat. Often, heartworm in a feline clears up on its own with proper care and nursing. Damage can be left behind when they’re gone, so monitoring is important. If worms were found in your cat’s lungs, your vet will most likely suggest regular chest x-rays.

Other treatment options include:

  • Prednisolone (medication to reduce inflammation)
  • Hospitalization
  • Fluids
  • Antibiotics
  • Cardiovascular drugs
  • Surgery
  • Oxygen therapy

It can take two to three years for the worms to complete their lifespan. Regular checkups and medication can help minimize symptoms during this time period. If heartworms are resolved, your veterinarian will probably recommend that your cat come in for continued checkups. This is to keep an eye on any damage the parasite might have done to her heart or lungs.

Heartworms Can Be Prevented

Since there is no standard cure for heartworms in cats, prevention is absolutely necessary. Even indoor cats can come in contact with mosquitoes.

Monthly heartworm preventive medications are a great way to keep the worms at bay. Even if your cat was previously diagnosed with the parasite, these medications can prevent a new infection. Heartworm preventative care for cats are available in topical and pill forms, which should be given once a month. Injectable medication may also be available through your veterinarian. These need to be administered every six months.

If you give your cat heartworm prevention medication, timing is essential. Missing a dose or administering one late could leave your pet open to infection. Kittens can be started on heartworm preventative as early as eight weeks, though dosage will change with their body weight.

Both indoor and outdoor cats can get heartworm! If you think your cat contracted the parasite or you would like to talk about preventative measures, don’t hesitate to get in contact with us. Give us a call at 281-693-7387, or visit us at 2519 Cinco Park Place in Katy TX.

Heartworm in Dogs: Signs & Symptoms, Prevention, and Treatment

Hearing the diagnosis of “heartworms” can be scary for a dog owner. It’s important to be educated on the disease, the signs and symptoms, treatment options, and understand how to prevent heartworms in your pup. Find out what heartworms are and how you can keep your dog safe!

If you believe your dog may be suffering from heartworms, make an appointment to see a veterinarian right away. Testing and preventative medication can help ensure the parasites don’t take hold. To schedule testing for your dog, call Cinco Ranch Veterinary Hospital in Katy, TX at 281-693-7387.

What Are Heartworms?

Heartworms are a very serious parasite for many animals. They’re found often in dogs and similar animals like wolves, coyotes, and foxes. The parasites are worms that can reach up to a foot long and generally live in the animal’s heart, hence the name. They can also be found in the lungs and blood vessels.

After only a year of being infected, dogs can have between 15 (the average) and hundreds of these parasites living in their body. Over time, they cause damage to the organs they call home. If left untreated, heartworms can continue to grow over seven years. They constantly produce offspring during that time.

If heartworms aren’t discovered and treated, they can lead to heart failure and death in dogs.

What Causes Heartworms in Dogs? 

Heartworm is not contagious from dog to dog. The parasite is carried by mosquitoes. After biting an animal infected with heartworm, mosquitoes carry the blood and baby worms to the next animal they bite. Over the next six months, the worms will mature inside the animal.

3 Mosquito-Borne Illnesses

The heartworm parasite can be found in all 50 states in the U.S. Previously, where mosquitoes were scarce, they weren’t a problem for dog owners, but because of variations in climate and other human developments, heartworm can now be found everywhere in the United States, including Texas.

It’s rare for humans to contract heartworms from mosquitoes, as it usually can’t complete its life cycle, but it does happen from time to time.

heartworm in dogs

What Are the Symptoms of Heartworm? 

When a dog first contracts heartworm, there will be very few, if any, symptoms. As the worms mature over time, signs of heartworm disease will become more apparent. The symptoms tend to be more obvious in more active dogs, so heartworm isn’t always clear in lazier pups.

If you notice any of these warning signs, it’s time to schedule an appointment with a veterinarian:

  • Persistent cough
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue (especially after exercise)
  • Decreased or loss of appetite
  • Nervousness
  • Weight loss
  • Reluctance to exercise
  • Swollen belly

If a dog is infected with large numbers of worms, more serious symptoms may develop, including:

  • Labored breathing
  • Bloody or dark urine
  • Pale gums
  • Heart failure

These signs are indicative of caval syndrome, which is caused by heartworms blocking blood flow. If you notice any of these symptoms in your dog, it’s important to get her to a veterinarian right away, as surgery must be done quickly.

How Can Heartworms Be Treated?

The first step to uncovering heartworms is a simple blood test. Your dog should have a heartworm test annually to ensure she hasn’t contracted the parasite. It can be done during a routine visit with your veterinarian. Even if your dog is on heartworm preventative medication, this important test shouldn’t be skipped.

If your dog tests positive for heartworms, they are treatable. Your veterinarian will first perform additional tests to confirm she indeed has heartworms. These tests include ultrasounds, radiographs, and others.

If heartworms are present, you should limit your pup’s exercise routine, as activity can cause damage to the infected organs. Your veterinarian then may suggest various treatment options for your dog’s heartworm. Immiticide is the drug often recommended to kill the worms, as long as they’re not extremely serious. Antibiotics, steroids, and other medication may also be given along with immiticide. In more severe cases, surgery to remove the worms may be necessary.

Can Heartworm in Dogs Be Prevented?

Heartworm disease in dogs can absolutely be prevented, and steps should be taken to restrict your pet’s chances of contracting the parasite. Yearly testing and preventative medications are two musts to keep your dog safe. The name of the preventative heartworm medicine is chemoprophylaxis. It also fights against:

  • Roundworms
  • Fleas
  • Tapeworms
  • Hookworms

Chemoprophylaxis comes in chewable, topical, and injectable forms.

Heartworm preventatives should always be given to your dog on time, every time. A missed or late dose—even by a couple of days—can leave your dog open to heartworm infection. Some are monthly heartworm preventives, while others are every six months. Speak with your veterinarian to come up with a schedule that will ensure your dog is protected year-round.

Heartworms are an extremely serious parasite for dogs, and prevention is important in the fight against them. Talk to your veterinarian about prevention techniques, and if you suspect your dog may have heartworms, bring her in for an appointment for testing as soon as possible.

Cinco Ranch Vet can help. Give us a call at 281-693-7387 to schedule an appointment, arrange for testing and treatment of heartworm disease, or discuss preventative options.

3 Mosquito-Borne Illnesses That Affect Pets & How to Prevent Them

When most people think of mosquitoes, they imagine the itchy bumps left on their skin and the diseases they carry that can affect humans. Have you thought about whether mosquitoes can affect your pet? Can your dog get West Nile virus?

There are a few illnesses mosquitoes can carry that you should know about if you’re a dog or cat owner. Then you can help protect and care for your pet when you’re out and about during mosquito season!

1. West Nile Virus

One question we hear is: Can my dog or cat get West Nile virus?

While your pet can catch this disease from mosquitoes, it isn’t one owners generally need to worry about. A study conducted on pets and West Nile found that both dogs and cats are very resistant to the disease. Dogs that were infected had such low measurable quantities of the virus that it would be very unlikely they would transmit it to another mosquito if they were bitten again.

Very few pets die from West Nile virus infection. In a study from 1999, 5% to 11% of dogs had the virus, but none of their owners reported signs of their pets being sick.

When symptoms do (rarely) occur, they can include:

  • Fever
  • Depression
  • Muscle weakness
  • Seizures
  • Paralysis
  • Neurological problems

If your pet is displaying these symptoms, your veterinarian will check for more likely causes first, as they’re rarely caused by West Nile virus.

Vet’s Note: Horses and birds they are most likely to be affected by the virus. If you see symptoms in your horse or pet bird, you should see a veterinarian right away.

2. Heartworm

Heartworm is one disease that all pet owners should be proactive about. It’s the most common disease transferred by mosquitoes to cats and dogs and can prove painful to your pet and expensive for you if you haven’t taken precautionary measures.

Heartworm Symptoms in Dogs

Symptoms of heartworm in dogs often don’t show up until seven months after an infected mosquito infects your animal. Once mature, the heartworms will begin to reproduce in your dog’s heart, lungs, and blood vessels. If not treated, heartworm can be fatal.

Symptoms include:

  • Coughing
  • Lack of energy
  • Reluctance to exercise
  • Weight loss
  • Decreased appetite
  • Abnormal lung sounds
  • Fainting

The best way to prevent heartworm disease in dogs is to use heartworm medication regularly. Your vet can prescribe it to you.

Heartworm Symptoms in Cats

For most cats, heartworm does not reach the adult stage, but even immature worms can cause issues, such as heartworm-associated respiratory disease.

Prevention is a must, as tests may not discover the immature worms, and in cases of infection, many cat owners don’t realize until it is too late.

There is no heartworm medication for cats. If your cat displays these symptoms, take him to the veterinarian immediately:

  • Coughing
  • Asthma
  • Lack of appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Vomiting
  • Fainting
  • Seizures
  • Fluid in abdomen
  • Coordination issues

can dogs get west nile

3. Eastern Equine Encephalitis

Dog and cat owners generally don’t need to worry about eastern equine encephalitis (EEE), as they’re usually resistant to health effects. EEE most often affects horses. If your pet does display symptoms, he will most likely make a full recovery. In the worst-case scenario, he’ll need supportive treatment.

You should contact your vet if you notice these symptoms in your dog or cat:

  • Fever
  • Vomiting
  • Seizures
  • Neurological issues

How Do You Know If Your Pet Has Been Bitten by a Mosquito?

Dogs and cats often display the same signs as humans when they’re bitten by mosquitoes! Constant scratching and irritation are most common, along with the red welts people are used to. They may also rub their ears or noses to find relief.

How to Prevent Mosquito Bites

You can help prevent the spread of West Nile virus, heartworm, and EEE to your dog or cat by doing a few simple things:

  • Use dog- and cat-friendly insect repellent – Never use insect repellent designed for humans on your pets; it can be toxic. If you do, contact your veterinarian immediately.
  • Get rid of standing water in your yard, such as bird baths, untreated pools, and collected rain water.
  • Don’t walk your dog during peak mosquito times: dawn and dusk.
  • Use window screens, and replace or repair any tears.
  • Administer preventative heartworm medication – It’s an inexpensive, monthly treatment. Always give your dog his heartworm medication on time and correctly. Missing a dose or administering it late can leave your pet open to infection.
  • Have your dog tested for heartworm – This can be done annually by your vet to ensure your dog is not infected. While heartworm medicine is highly effective, it’s not 100%.

While you don’t have to worry too much about your dog or cat contracting West Nile virus or EEE from mosquitoes, preventative measures should still be taken to reduce the chances of contracting more severe illnesses, like heartworm. Medication and steps to remove mosquito habitats from your property go a long way in pet care, but if yours displays symptoms of West Nile virus, EEE, or heartworms, get him to a veterinarian quickly. Early detection is key to ensuring your pet stays in good health.

Whether your dog or cat is showing symptoms of one of these three infections, you would like to start your pet on preventative measures, or you need prescription refills, visit Cinco Ranch Veterinary Hospital in Katy, Texas. To book an appointment or bring your pet in for an emergency, give us a call at 281-693-7387.

Has My Cat Been Poisoned? How to Tell & What to Do Next

While the curiosity of cats can be endearing, sometimes it means they get into things they definitely shouldn’t. Some items around your house could be poisonous to your pet, so prevention is key. Fortunately, many symptoms of cat poisoning are very noticeable. Here’s what you need to know!

What Is Poisonous to a Cat?

There are many things in the average household that may be safe for humans but are poisonous to cats. Most cat owners know of the dangers of antifreeze, for example, but there are other items inside and outside to keep out of reach of your furry friend. A few of the most common poisons include:

  • Insecticides, like dog flea medication and lawn and garden products
  • Cleaners and chemicals, like toilet bowl cleaner and bleach (which can cause respiratory issues)
  • Plants, like some types of ribbon plants, daffodils (which cause stomach problems or damage to the heart), and lily of the valley
  • Human medications, like antidepressants and aspirin
  • Some human food, like chocolate, onions and garlic (which can cause extensive damage to red blood cells), and candy

These are only a few examples of what can be dangerous for your cat. Before bringing a new item into your home, adding a plant to your garden if you have an outdoor cat, or giving your pet scraps from the table, always double-check if it’s safe for them. Animals, such as some types of snakes and black widows, can also be dangerous if your cat gets bitten.

symptoms of cat poisoning

Signs of Poisoning in Cats

Although movies may portray “poisoning” as something that happens instantly, in real life it’s usually an effect that displays symptoms before becoming fatal. Time is important, however! The sooner you notice the symptoms of poisoning in your cat, the more likely your pet will not suffer any lasting effects.

If you notice any of these symptoms, it’s important to take your cat to the vet immediately:

  • Diarrhea
  • Not eating
  • Drooling
  • Off-colored gums
  • Excessive thirst
  • Seizures
  • Vomiting
  • Hyper behavior
  • Anxiety
  • Weakness

Cats are experts at hiding their symptoms—or even hiding themselves—from their owners, so keep a keen eye out for changes in your cat’s behavior.

What to Do If Your Cat Is Poisoned

If you notice anything strange or unusual in your cat’s behavior or health, or you witness him eat a poisonous item, it’s best to visit your vet or go to a veterinary ER hospital. Don’t wait for symptoms. Catching a problem early can help prevent it from becoming something bigger.

You may want to consider calling an Animal Poison Control hotline. Describing the item and/or symptoms to an expert can help you determine what to do if your pet was poisoned, even after normal veterinarian hours.

It’s a good idea to bring along a sample to the vet of whatever your furry friend ate, as it can help your vet create a treatment plan—unless your cat was bitten by a venomous animal. Don’t bring the animal in if it’s still alive. Attempting to catch it could put your health or life at risk. If the animal is dead, carefully bring it in with your cat, so your veterinarian can determine the correct antidote.

Put your veterinarian, emergency vet, and even perhaps Animal Poison Control in your contact list in case of an emergency. Keep your pet’s ID, medical records, and microchip info near the front door in case you have to make a quick trip to the vet due to poisoning or another problem.

What Happens When You Get to the Vet with a Poisoned Cat

Your veterinarian will create a treatment plan for your cat, depending on what he ate or came in contact with and the symptoms he is displaying. Your vet may induce vomiting, provide an antidote or other medications, or give your cat fluids. Never induce vomiting on your own nor try any at-home medications on your cat unless specifically advised to do so by a professional. Administering them incorrectly could do more harm.

Your cat’s doctor will most likely want you to come in for follow-up visits to monitor your cat’s progress and health. If, after treatment, the symptoms of poisoning return, bring your cat back to the vet immediately.

How to Prevent Poisoning in Your Cat

Many new parents baby-proof their homes when bringing home a newborn. The best way to prevent poisoning in your cat is to approach his safety the same way. Whether you already have a cat or are welcoming a new kitten, these steps can keep your cat curious, but out of harm’s way:

  • Keep all known poisons out of reach or locked away.
  • Keep medications in child-proof containers in closets or other safe locations.
  • Research any human food before giving it to your cat (or don’t give it to him at all, especially if you don’t know all the ingredients).
  • Clean up immediately after eating or cooking.
  • Investigate all new plants that you bring into your home or plant in the garden.
  • Do not use insecticides in the house.
  • Refrain from using garden products if you have an outdoor or indoor-outdoor cat.
  • Keep garbage out of reach.
  • Carefully follow the instructions on pet medications to avoid overdosing or poisoning from incorrect skin contact.

If your cat is displaying the symptoms of poisoning, or you suspect he ate something poisonous or dangerous, time is of the essence. It’s vital that you get him to a vet or contact a professional as soon as possible. Fast treatment can reduce the chance of lasting effects on your pet’s health.

Do you suspect your cat may be poisoned? Is he displaying the symptoms of poisoning in cats? Visit us at 2519 Cinco Park Place in Katy, Texas, or give us a call at 281-693-7387 for advice or assistance. If we are closed, we’ll refer you to a nearby veterinary emergency center.

The Shots Your Kitten Needs to Start Life Right!

If you’ve just brought a cat into your family, congratulations! He’s yours to cuddle and play with. But part of kitten care is keeping him safe and healthy, and that means getting him the vaccines he needs to start life right. Your furry friend needs a range of vaccinations and boosters to give him the best chance at a healthy future.

Find out which shots are important for your cat’s health, why, and when you should schedule them.

Rabies Vaccine

Rabies is a serious disease, and the vaccine is one of the most important shots for your cat. It’s required by law in many cities and towns across the United States.

Rabies can affect a wide range of animals, including humans, and it’s a fatal disease.

Signs of rabies in cats include:

  • Sudden change in behavior (usually aggressive)
  • Inability to swallow
  • Lethargy
  • Trouble breathing
  • Change in voice
  • Sudden death

There is no cure for rabies, so vaccination is essential.

When Your Kitten Should Get the Rabies Shot

Many veterinarians suggest getting the rabies shot at about 12 weeks, but you can schedule it at 8 weeks. Your cat should receive a rabies booster shot a year later and, at most, every three years after that.

After your cat receives his vaccination, keep the paperwork on hand for easy reference.

what shots do kittens need

Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine

Feline rhinotracheitis, also known as the feline herpesvirus infection or feline herpes, is taken care of as part of the FVRCP combination vaccine. Herpes in cats is one of the main causes of upper respiratory infections and can also lead to conjunctivitis.

This virus appears 2 to 5 days after infection, lasts for up to 20 days, and can reactivate during stressful periods during your cat’s life. When symptoms are apparent, your cat can infect other cats.

The signs of feline herpes include:

  • Ulcers on the eyes
  • Squinting
  • Eye discharge
  • Sneezing
  • Nasal discharge
  • Eating less
  • Lethargy

When Your Kitten Should Get the Feline Herpes Shot

Feline rhinotracheitis is particularly dangerous for kittens, but it’s unpleasant for adult cats as well and can put other felines at risk as well. The FVRCP vaccine is a three-part shot that can be administered at six weeks, though eight weeks is the recommended age. After the initial shot, your kitten will receive an additional shot every 3 to 4 weeks until he’s about 16 weeks old. He should get a booster at about one year.

Feline Calicivirus Vaccine

The ‘C’ in the FVRCP vaccine stands for feline calicivirus, also known as FVC. Another common cause of upper respiratory disease, this is an infection often found in shelters. Kittens are most likely to catch calicivirus, so vaccination is essential.

Common symptoms of this virus include:

  • Mouth ulcers
  • Drooling
  • Lethargy
  • Sneezing
  • Red and watering eyes
  • Lack of appetite
  • Runny nose
  • Arthritis
  • Fever

The calicivirus is resilient, so it can spread easily. It can be very dangerous to cats and may result in pneumonia, so care is essential if your cat catches this virus.

When Your Kitten Should Get the FVC Shot

Kittens should follow the FVRCP schedule for this disease.

Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine

The third part of the FVRCP vaccine is for feline panleukopenia, which is also known as “feline distemper” or “feline parvo.” In prior years, this virus was extremely dangerous to cats and proved fatal to many. Today it is an uncommon disease, thanks largely to the vaccine.

FP acts by attacking cells in the bone marrow, lymph nodes, and intestines (or fetus in the case of a pregnant cat). More common (and deadly) to young cats, symptoms of panleukopenia include:

  • Lack of energy
  • Fever
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Lack of appetite
  • Low white blood cell counts

If your cat catches this virus, he’ll need intensive care.

When Your Kitten Should Get the Feline Parvo Shot

Kittens should follow the FVRCP schedule for this disease.

Feline Leukemia Vaccine

The feline leukemia (FeLV) vaccine is often recommended by veterinarians, but it’s not required. Indoor only cats are less likely to catch FeLV, but indoor-outdoor cats or outdoor cats can be highly susceptible. The virus is passed from cat to cat by bodily fluids, so grooming and fighting are common ways for cats to catch it.

The symptoms of feline leukemia virus include:

  • Fever
  • Inflamed gums
  • Lack of appetite and energy
  • Infections
  • Weight loss

When Your Kitten Should Get the Feline Leukemia Shot

Although this vaccine is not considered a core shot, many vets highly recommend it. Most cats that catch FeLV pass away within three years. Your kitten should receive this vaccination around 8 to 12 weeks and receive a booster about a month later.

Other Kitten Vaccinations

what shots do kittens need

There may be other vaccinations for your kitten that your veterinarian recommends—or are required by some boarding facilities—based on his environment and his health history.

Veterinarians generally only recommend the FIV (feline immunodeficiency virus) vaccine for cats at high risk. Many cats can live with FIV for years with proper care, but critical signs of the disease include:

  • Fever
  • Weight loss
  • Lack of appetite
  • Diarrhea
  • Wounds that don’t heal
  • Inflammation

If your vet suggests this vaccination, your kitten will receive his first shot at about eight weeks old and then two booster shots in the next six weeks.

The chlamydophila felis shot is another vaccine that may be recommended by your vet if your new kitten lives in an area where the infection already exists. It can cause upper respiratory problems, as well as limping or a reduced appetite. The first shot can be received at nine weeks or older and requires a booster about a month later.

Bordetella is an extremely common bacteria found in kennels, so the vaccine is often required by boarding facilities. Kittens are most susceptible and will display severe symptoms, but any cat can catch this disease.

Signs include:

  • Fever
  • Sneezing
  • Loss of appetite
  • Breathing problems
  • Swollen lymph nodes

Talk to your veterinarian about this vaccine and whether or not they believe it is for your cat. If your cat requires it, he’ll need a booster shot every year.

Your kitten’s core vaccinations are essential to his health and wellness. Young cats are especially susceptible to many viruses and bacterial infections, so it’s important to talk to your vet about vaccination schedules and recommendations.

We can help you create a shot and booster schedule to make sure your furry friend gets the preventive care he needs. We’d love to meet your new family member! To schedule his first checkup or a booster shot, give Cinco Ranch Veterinary Hospital a call at 281-693-7387.

How to Know Whether Your Cat Has an Intestinal Blockage and What To Do About It

Cats are known as curious for a reason! Sometimes get into things they’re not supposed to. While many of these items are harmless to your furry friend and/or pass through her digestive system without a problem, other items can cause intestinal blockages. But intestinal obstructions in cats aren’t only caused by foreign bodies. Sometimes they point to a larger health problem.

Educate yourself on the signs and symptoms of an intestinal blockage in your cat, so you can be the best advocate for their health and safety and know exactly what to do if you suspect one.

What Causes Intestinal Blockages in Cats?

She Ate Something Odd

A common cause of intestinal blockages in cats is foreign bodies. Sometimes a cat eats something she absolutely shouldn’t—like tin foil. But other times, she might have swallowed part of her toy by accident.

Here are some things you’ll want to keep out of reach of your kitty:

  • String
  • Paper clips
  • Yarn
  • Tinsel
  • Rubber bands
  • Feathers
  • Dental floss
  • Ribbon
  • Plastic
  • Tin foil
  • Fabric
  • Needles and thread

Did your cat eat string?

She Has a Medical Condition

Blockages aren’t only caused by foreign bodies. They could be the result of another medical problem including:

  • Tumors
  • Roundworms
  • Gastroenteritis
  • Torsion
  • Narrowing of the intestine or stomach
  • Hernias
  • Another issue that involves the digestive system, stomach, or intestines

What Are the Signs of an Intestinal Blockage?

In many cases, if your cat ate a foreign object, it will pass on its own, and you will never notice there was a problem. In other cases, whether the cause is a foreign body or another medical issue, the signs of an intestinal blockage are clear, but may also be evidence of another problem.

Here’s what you should look out for:

  • Vomiting
  • Constipation
  • Straining to go to the bathroom
  • Diarrhea
  • Not eating or not eating much
  • Lethargy
  • Behavioral changes
  • Doesn’t want to be picked up
  • Abdominal swelling
  • Abdominal pain

Sometimes the type of symptom your cat has will point to the severity of the issue. For example, constant vomiting can indicate a complete obstruction in the digestive track, while intermittent vomiting is a sign of a partial blockage. Diarrhea can happen when there is a partial block, but constipation points to a complete intestinal blockage.

When to Bring Your Cat to the Vet for an Intestinal Blockage

If you notice any of the above signs or symptoms, bring your cat to the vet as soon as possible. Delaying could cause more serious problems.

If you see your cat eat something she’s not supposed to or suspect that she did, take her to your veterinarian right away. In many cases, it can be easier to get the foreign body out if it’s still in her stomach.

You may notice the foreign body in your cat’s mouth or throat, or coming out of her rectum. Do not pull on it. Items such as string might be wrapped around your cat’s tongue or intestines. Removing it incorrectly could cause harm to your cat.

How Is a Cat’s Intestinal Blockage Treated?

The treatment for your cat’s intestinal blockage depends on the cause, but also the location. First, your veterinarian will do X-rays and ultrasounds, sometimes using dye to locate the item and determine what it is. Many vets also complete blood tests and collect urine samples to ensure no other organs are affected. These tests can help you rule out other causes of blockages, like infections.

A gastric endoscopy is another tool your veterinarian may use. A small camera is directed through your cat’s digestive track. If the cause is a small foreign body, tools used in a gastric endoscopy can even allow the vet to retrieve the item without invasive surgery.

The next step is determined by the discoveries made by the X-rays, ultrasound, and endoscopy. If the item is a foreign body and found in the stomach, your vet may induce vomiting. Never try this on your cat at home. Doing it incorrectly can harm her. If the foreign object is located elsewhere in your cat’s digestive tract, your vet may want to see if it passes on its own or may suggest surgery.

If the item or problem can’t be located, exploratory surgery may be recommended to determine the exact cause. With anesthesia, your vet can find the obstruction.

If your cat’s intestinal obstruction isn’t caused by a foreign body, your vet may suggest the following:

  • Torsion – The vet will untwist the intestine and attach it to the side of the stomach to prevent the issue from reoccurring.
  • Dead or deteriorating bowels – Your vet will remove the dead or deteriorating sections and reattach the intestines that are in good condition.
  • Heartworms – Deworming medication is safe and simple.

For obstructions caused by cancer or other medical issues such as gastritis, your veterinarian will outline a specific treatment plan or other options available to you and your cat. The doctor may also have suggestions regarding diet after treatment.

cat intestinal blockage

How to Prevent Intestinal Blockages in Cats

Not all intestinal blockages in cats are preventable, as health issues such as cancer and torsion can happen at any time in a cat’s life. Other causes can be prevented!

Keep Objects Out of Reach

There are some items your cat will be very interested in, such as string. Put these items away out of reach when you are done using them.

Carefully Select Toys

Not all toys labeled as “cat toys” are safe for your furry friend. Ribbons and bells can easily detach and be swallowed. Carefully research toys and read reviews before purchasing them. Some objects may be safe for cats, such as dangling wands, but only under supervision. When not using these toys, keep them out of reach.

Keep Garbage Out of Reach

If your cat has a habit of getting into the garbage, try keeping it away from her, like in a closet or under lock to ensure she doesn’t go exploring for something she shouldn’t hve, even after you’ve thrown it away.

Keep a Clean Environment

Homes with roaches or mice put your cat’s health at risk. These animals’ waste products can provide a source for roundworm infection. Roundworm eggs can also be passed from cat to cat through their stool. Keeping a clean home and litterbox are essential to your pet’s health.

If you notice the signs of an intestinal blockage in your cat or pet, take her to your veterinarian immediately. Left untreated, it could lead to more health problems. Try to keep foreign items out of reach to reduce the chance of an intestinal obstruction, but also monitor your cats’ health and behavior for sudden changes.

Do you suspect your cat ate something she wasn’t supposed to? Is your cat having trouble going to the bathroom, or has she stopped eating? It’s time to visit your veterinarian. We offer a wide range of services to find the exact cause of the problem and have the expertise to recommend the proper treatment for your cat.

To schedule an appointment or to bring your cat in for an emergency visit, please call us at 281-693-7387, or visit us at 2519 Cinco Park Place in Katy, Texas.

What Shots Does Your Puppy Need and Why?

You have a new puppy! You’ve given him a name, puppy-proofed the house, and introduced him to your family.

Next step: Take him to the veterinarian for his puppy shots!

Not only will your vet make sure your dog is in good health, they’ll get him on a vaccination schedule, which is essential to your dog’s health, now and in the future. Many of the diseases against which vaccines protect are highly contagious and can be deadly.

Here are the shots your puppy needs, what they protect against, and when he should get them.

Rabies Vaccine

One of the most commonly known vaccine for dogs is the rabies vaccine. Required by law, it is essential to get this puppy shot and the tag and paperwork that goes along with it.

Rabies is a viral disease that can pass from animal to animal or from animal to human through a bite or through infected saliva getting into an open wound.

If your puppy doesn’t receive the rabies vaccination and contracts the disease, he could experience a failure of his central nervous system that results in:

  • Hallucinations
  • Drooling
  • Restlessness
  • Aggression
  • Paralysis
  • Fever
  • Seizures
  • Weakness

An animal with rabies won’t display symptoms until two to eight weeks after being infected, and there is no cure for the disease.

When Your Puppy Should Get the Rabies Shot

Your puppy should get his first rabies shot around four to seven months old. At 12 to 16 months, he’ll need a booster shot. After that, your dog will require a rabies shot every one to three years.

Keep your pup’s up-to-date rabies vaccination paperwork in a safe place, and put his rabies tag on his collar. He’ll need proof of vaccination to play in dog parks and often to get his nails clipped.

Kennel Cough Vaccines

Aptly named, this illness can quickly spread among dogs in a kennel, boarding facility, or animal shelter if infected dogs are housed there. Kennel cough is very commonly caused by Bordetella or canine parainfluenza.

The Bordetella shot is not required, but highly recommended, especially if you’re heading to dog parks or training courses. If you plan on boarding your puppy during your vacations, this shot will most likely be required by the facility.

If your puppy contracts kennel cough, he will develop:

  • A sharp, dry cough
  • Gagging and retching
  • Loss of appetite

Kennel cough tends to be mild, but, in more severe cases, it can be dangerous.

When Your Puppy Should Get the Kennel Cough Shot

Your puppy should get the Bordetella vaccine at 6 to 8 weeks, again between 12 and 16 months, and yearly after that.

There are two strains of the canine parainfluenza vaccine. The first shot will be given when your puppy is about 7 weeks old, with a follow-up for the other strain when he is 11 weeks. The second vaccine is part of the DHPP vaccine, also known as DA2P. This is a combination vaccination that also protects your pup against canine distemper, hepatitis, and parvovirus. He’ll get a follow-up DHPP shot at 14 to 16 weeks, 12 to 16 months, and every year or two following.

Distemper Vaccine

As with rabies, canine distemper has no cure, which makes this puppy shot extremely important. Unlike rabies, this disease can spread through the air as well as on contact.

The signs of distemper include:

  • A high fever
  • Discharge
  • Diarrhea
  • Coughing
  • Vomiting
  • Seizures

Puppies and older dogs are at the most risk. Treatment tends to be supportive until distemper runs its course. Dogs with weaker immune systems may struggle to fight distemper, and symptoms may last for months even in healthy puppies. Distemper can be passed to other animals months after your pup is recovered.

When Your Puppy Should Get the Distemper Shot

Your puppy should receive his first shot between six weeks and eight weeks of age to be protected against distemper. After the initial shot, this vaccination is part of the DHPP vaccine. (See Kennel Cough Vaccines.)

puppy shots

Parvovirus Vaccine

Puppies are most prone to catching the parvovirus, also known as “parvo.”

Symptoms come on fast and include vomiting, fever, and bloody diarrhea by affecting the gastrointestinal system.

If you suspect your puppy has parvo, bring him to your veterinarian immediately. Early treatment is essential, as the illness can be fatal in under 48 hours.

When Your Puppy Should Get the Parvovirus Shot

The parvovirus vaccine is a part of DHPP, so it is included in your puppy’s core shots at 10 to 12 weeks. Follow-up vaccines should be given at ages 15 weeks, 12 to 16 months, and every 1 to 2 years following.

Hepatitis Vaccine

Also part of the DHPP vaccine is the hepatitis vaccine. There is no cure for hepatitis in dogs, but your pup can be treated until the illness passes. In more severe cases, hepatitis can be fatal or cause damage to the liver.

Canine hepatitis is also known as canine adenovirus. It begins as an upper respiratory infection and spreads to the liver, kidney, and other organs. Signs include bleeding disorders, swelling, abdominal pain, fever, and lethargy. In some cases, it could even cause the eyes to become inflamed.

When Your Puppy Should Get the Hepatitis Shot

Follow the DHPP schedule for these shots: 10 to 12 weeks, 14 to 16 weeks, and every year or two after that.

Other Dog Vaccinations

Some other diseases you should consider for good puppy health are leptospirosis, Lyme disease, and coronavirus, but these are generally considered optional vaccines.

If you decide to vaccinate your puppy for these three diseases, he should get them at 10 to 12 weeks, again at 14 to 16 weeks, another time at 12 to 16 months, and then have a booster shot every year or two after that.

Leptospirosis doesn’t always show symptoms, but it is caused by bacteria. If signs do appear, they can include:

  • Fever
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Jaundice
  • Kidney failure

Antibiotics are the best treatment if your puppy isn’t vaccinated.

Lyme disease is an illness humans are very familiar with, but while we get a rash, dogs do not. Symptoms in canines include:

  • Fever
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • A limp

Lyme disease can affect various parts of your pup’s body and lead to more serious problems if not treated. Antibiotics can help, although symptoms may show up again later.

Canine coronavirus (CCV) affects the intestines. It’s very contagious and may not always display symptoms. If your puppy does show signs, they may be:

  • Vomiting
  • Explosive diarrhea
  • Depression

CCV isn’t necessarily dangerous, but if caught at the same time as parvo or other diseases, it can be fatal.

Are you bringing home a new puppy? Make an appointment for his puppy shots! We can help you create a custom puppy vaccination schedule for your new family member. Each puppy is different. While these are general guidelines to follow for puppy shots, it’s important to ask your veterinarian about your dog specifically. They may suggest one or two vaccines a little earlier than usual, or a little later.

These shots can help ensure your puppy’s health throughout his life and all his adventures. Reach us by calling 281-693-7387 to schedule your dog’s first vet appointment!

My Cat is Getting Old: What Do I Need to Know?

As your cat gets older, it’s important to keep an eye on him. Cats are masters of disguise, and a slight change in behavior could point to an underlying problem in an older cat.

You can give your cat his best life through the years if you know the signs of aging in cats and the problems that can arise from the simple passage of time.

All cats should get regular check-ups with their vet, but it’s extremely important for aging cats. Your veterinarian can help catch issues early, especially if your senior is good at hiding them. Feel free to call Cinco Ranch Veterinary at 281-693-7387 to schedule your cat’s next check-up.

Sign #1: Your Cat Is Having Trouble Eating

As your cat ages, his teeth are more prone to dental disease, which can make eating difficult. Signs of a dental issue include:

How You Can Help Your Cat

Like other injuries and illnesses, cats can hide dental issues from their owners, so it’s important to regularly check your cat’s teeth or have it done by a vet, even when he’s young. It’s best to catch a dental problem before it progresses into something more serious that could require surgery or tooth removal. Brushing and specialized diets can also help prevent problems.

If your cat is already missing teeth or having other mouth issues, either from aging or dental disease, your vet may recommend a specific diet to make it easier for him to eat.

Not sure how to brush your cat’s teeth?

Sign #2: Your Cat Isn’t Coming When You Call

Cats, just like humans, are prone to changes in hearing. Becoming hard of hearing is an extremely common sign of aging in cats. Over time, your cat may experience damage to his ear or nerves, resulting in hearing loss.

Signs your senior may be going deaf include:

How You Can Help Your Cat

If your cat is going deaf or just not hearing as well as he used to, try not to sneak up or startle him. If your cat is an outdoor cat, consider keeping him inside instead, as he won’t be able to hear cars and other dangers. To keep your cat safe should he wander off, give him a microchip.

Sign #3: Your Cat Is Running into Things

Deteriorating sight is also a sign of an aging cat. Haziness and cloudiness is common in older cats and, in most cases, doesn’t affect their ability to see, but other issues like cataracts and high blood pressure should be given extra attention.

Cataracts are not extremely common in cats, even in seniors, but can occur. Look out for whitish pupils. High blood pressure, just like in humans, can lead to blindness in your cat. Unlike cataracts, it’s extremely common in cats.

How You Can Help Your Cat

One of the first things you should do if you have a cat who is blind or losing his sight is avoid adding hazards to his environment. He’s probably already comfortable in your home, so don’t move things he’ll remember the placement of, like furniture. Cats rely more on their hearing and smell than their sight, so the loss of it doesn’t mean your cat can’t live a full life; however, you should never let a blind cat outside.

If you notice your cat is having trouble seeing in the dark, take him to a vet as soon as possible. This could be a sign of high blood pressure and may be able to be treated before it worsens.

Sign #4: Your Cat Isn’t as Energetic as Before

As any pet ages, they tend to lose energy. Your cat will sleep more and play less, and that’s completely normal. If your cat becomes lethargic, however, make an appointment with your vet.

How You Can Help Your Cat

The best thing you can do for any senior cat keep them out of stressful situations. This includes big changes, new pets, and new situations. When stressed, cats can lash out at other animals, cease using the litter box, or become more aggressive overall. Ask your vet about reducing stress.

signs of aging in cats

Sign #5: Your Cat Isn’t Moving Like He Used to

Aging cats are extremely prone to arthritis. The smallest of physical changes could point to this problem, so if you notice your cat limping or grooming himself differently as he ages, take him to the vet for a check-up.

Other signs of trouble moving include no longer jumping on your bed and other furniture and simply not being able to climb into his litter box.

How You Can Help Your Cat

The symptoms of arthritis can absolutely be treated by a vet and will reduce pain and discomfort. Your veterinarian may recommend a different diet, weight loss, or medication.

Your cat may have difficulty reaching specific spots on his body when he grooms himself. Grooming your cat will prevent problems like matting.

Rearranging your home slightly will also help your feline friend. Make access to his water and food bowls, litter box(es), toys, and favorite places a little easier to reach. He’ll also appreciate a little help if they are looking to get into bed with you.

Other Signs of Aging in Cats

There are several other signs that your cat is aging that are not cause for alarm, like brittle claws and changes to his coat texture or color. If you’re concerned about a particular change, ask your vet!

Just like humans, cats change as they age. Unlike humans, cats are expert at hiding symptoms, discomfort, and pain. So you need to be the lookout! If you notice alterations in your aging cat’s behavior or physical appearance, keep an eye on them for other changes to prevent problems. If you suspect something is wrong, contact your vet.

One of the best things you can do for your aging cat is to get regular check-ups. This can help set your mind at ease and ensure your senior is getting the best care, nutrition, and attention possible as he gets older. If it’s time for your senior’s check-up or you suspect a problem, call us at 281-693-7387.

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